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dc.contributor.authorCasey, M. D.
dc.contributor.authorSegall, L. J.
dc.contributor.authorBlank, C. E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T16:01:27Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T16:01:27Z
dc.date.issued1966
dc.identifier.citationCasey, M. D., Segall, L. J., Street, D. R. K. & Blank, C. E. (1966). Sex chromosome abnormalities in two state hospitals for patients requiring special security. Nature, 209(5023), pp.641-642.
dc.identifier.other10.1038/209641a0
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/handle/123456789/1731
dc.description.abstractTHE association between sex chromatin abnormality and mental sub-normality is well established. The incidence of sex chromatin abnormality in the new-born male and female population is about 0.2 per cent and 0.08 per cent respectively; in institutionalized mentally sub-normal male and female populations about 1 per cent and 0.4 per cent respectively. Court Brown1 reported that a high proportion of sex chromatin positive males recognized in his unit had been committed to a mental defective institution because of anti-social behaviour. He suggested that an abnormal sex chromosome complement might predispose to delinquency. However, a survey by Wegman and Smith2 on a group of socially disturbed males of relatively normal intelligence failed to show an increase in sex chromatin abnormality.
dc.description.urihttp://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v209/n5023/abs/209641a0.html
dc.subjectChromosome disorders
dc.titleSex chromosome abnormalities in two state hospitals for patients requiring special security
dc.typeCorrespondence


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