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dc.contributor.authorLockwood, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorDaley, David
dc.contributor.authorSayal, Kapil
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-30T13:26:11Z
dc.date.available2018-05-30T13:26:11Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationLockwood, J., Townsend, E., Royes, L., Daley, D. & Sayal, K. (2018). What do young adolescents think about taking part in longitudinal self-harm research? Findings from a school-based study. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 12 (1), pp. 23.en
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s13034-018-0230-7
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/handle/123456789/2911
dc.description.abstractBackground: Research about self-harm in adolescence is important given the high incidence in youth, and strong links to suicide and other poor outcomes. Clarifying the impact of involvement in school-based self-harm studies on young adolescents is an ethical priority given heightened risk at this developmental stage. Methods: Here, 594 school-based students aged mainly 13-14 years completed a survey on self-harm at baseline and again 12-weeks later. Change in mood following completion of each survey, ratings and thoughts about participation, and responses to a mood-mitigation activity were analysed using a multi-method approach. Results: Baseline participation had no overall impact on mood. However, boys and girls reacted differently to the survey depending on self-harm status. Having a history of self-harm had a negative impact on mood for girls, but a positive impact on mood for boys. In addition, participants rated the survey in mainly positive/neutral terms, and cited benefits including personal insight and altruism. At follow-up, there was a negative impact on mood following participation, but no significant effect of gender or self-harm status. Ratings at follow-up were mainly positive/neutral. Those who had self-harmed reported more positive and fewer negative ratings than at baseline: the opposite pattern of response was found for those who had not self-harmed. Mood-mitigation activities were endorsed. Conclusions: Self-harm research with youth is feasible in school-settings. Most young people are happy to take part and cite important benefits. However, the impact of participation in research appears to vary according to gender, self-harm risk and method/time of assessment. The impact of repeated assessment requires clarification. Simple mood-elevation techniques may usefully help to mitigate distress. © 2018 The Author(s).en
dc.description.urihttps://capmh.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13034-018-0230-7en
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dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectSelf-injurious behaviouren
dc.subjectSchoolsen
dc.titleWhat do young adolescents think about taking part in longitudinal self-harm research? Findings from a school-based studyen
dc.typeArticleen


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