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dc.contributor.authorCraig, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-06T11:13:16Z
dc.date.available2020-02-06T11:13:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationElliott, R. A., Boyd, M. J., Tanajewski, L., Barber, N., Gkountouras, G., Avery, A. J., Mehta, R., Davies, J. E., Salema, N. E., Craig, C., et al. (2019). 'New Medicine Service': supporting adherence in people starting a new medication for a long-term condition: 26-week follow-up of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. BMJ Quality and Safety, DOI: 10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009177en
dc.identifier.other10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009177
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/handle/123456789/3393
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the community pharmacy New Medicine Service (NMS) at 26 weeks. METHODS: Pragmatic patient-level parallel randomised controlled trial in 46 English community pharmacies. 504 participants aged >/=14, identified in the pharmacy when presenting a prescription for a new medicine for predefined long-term conditions, randomised to receive NMS (n=251) or normal practice (n=253) (NMS intervention: 2 consultations 1 and 2 weeks after prescription presentation). Adherence assessed through patient self-report at 26-week follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis employed. National Health Service (NHS) costs calculated. Disease-specific Markov models estimating impact of non-adherence combined with clinical trial data to calculate costs per extra quality-adjusted life-year (QALY; NHS England perspective). RESULTS: Unadjusted analysis: of 327 patients still taking the initial medicine, 97/170 (57.1%) and 103/157 (65.6%) (p=0.113) patients were adherent in normal practice and NMS arms, respectively. Adjusted intention-to-treat analysis: adherence OR 1.50 (95% CI 0.93 to 2.44, p=0.095), in favour of NMS. There was a non-significant reduction in 26-week NHS costs for NMS: - pound104 (95% CI - pound37 to pound257, p=0.168) per patient. NMS generated a mean of 0.04 (95% CI -0.01 to 0.13) more QALYs per patient, with mean reduction in lifetime cost of - pound113.9 (-1159.4, 683.7). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was - pound2758/QALY (2.5% and 97.5%: -38 739.5, 34 024.2. NMS has an 89% probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay of pound20 000 per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: At 26-week follow-up, NMS was unable to demonstrate a statistically significant increase in adherence or reduction in NHS costs, which may be attributable to patient attrition from the study. Long-term economic evaluation suggested NMS may deliver better patient outcomes and reduced overall healthcare costs than normal practice, but uncertainty around this finding is high. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01635361, ISRCTN23560818, ISRCTN23560818, UKCRN12494.en
dc.description.urihttps://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/early/2019/11/15/bmjqs-2018-009177en
dc.subjectCosts and cost analysisen
dc.subjectPharmacologyen
dc.subjectPatient complianceen
dc.subjectAttitude to healthen
dc.title'New Medicine Service': supporting adherence in people starting a new medication for a long-term condition: 26-week follow-up of a pragmatic randomised controlled trialen
dc.typeArticleen


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